Culture

How millennials are warping the vinyl industry

[ad_1] VINYL evokes another time. In “Call the Midwife”, a drama set in the late 1950s, the young women return from a day of delivering infants to enjoy a Horlicks and a Chordettes record. In “Mad Men”, Don Draper can often be seen nursing an Old Fashioned with some Big John Hamilton or Peggy Lee whirring on the turntable. But ...

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Football agents and managers in England stand accused of corruption

[ad_1] WHERE there is money in football, there is usually corruption. In England, the game turned professional in the late 19th century; by 1915 it had experienced its first major scandal, as the Football Association (FA), the national administrative body, banned seven players who colluded to fix a match between Liverpool and Manchester United. A century later, match-fixing remains a ...

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Autopilot is the enemy

[ad_1] Creativity’s brewing there, somewhere Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives. By Tim Harford. Riverhead; 327 pages; $28. Little, Brown; £20. SELF-HELP books offer ways for readers to whip their lives into shape. A new book by Tim Harford, an economist and columnist at the Financial Times, argues that we need to whip our lives out of ...

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Weapons of crass construction

[ad_1] AMERICA’S Supreme Court allows them to be banned from public spaces, and permits heavy fines for their improper handling, making rare exceptions to the protections of the constitution’s Bill of Rights. Guns? Only in a saner world. The weapons in question are swear-words, and readers who agree that they are objectively dangerous will want to stop reading at this ...

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How a 1980s song about childbirth became a tribute to Black Lives Matter

[ad_1] MUSIC is a salve for the woes of modern times. The protest songs of the 1960s and 1970s delivered anthems for freedom and peace during the American Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. Today’s musicians continue to raise their voices. In the summer of 2016, tragedies demanded attention from the music community. Christina Aguilera released “Change” to honour ...

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Unmasked?

[ad_1] THESE are tough times for champions of transparency. Julian Assange languishes at the Ecuadorean embassy in London; Edward Snowden in an undisclosed place in Russia. Rudolf Elmer, a Swiss banking whistle-blower, is contesting a 14-month suspended jail sentence. And if Claudio Gatti, an Italian investigative journalist, expected plaudits for a story he published on October 2nd claiming to identify ...

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A thumping win in a highly unpredictable tournament

[ad_1] BY THE TIME the last players were finishing their rounds, the winner of the 2016 Ryder Cup was already known. Team USA had not fallen behind their European opponents at any point during the three-day competition at Hazeltine National Golf Club in Minnesota. The tournament is decided using match-play rules, whereby players score points for the number of holes ...

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For all his accolades, Arnold Palmer was under-rated

[ad_1] THE death of Arnold Palmer (pictured, right) late last month at the age of 87 has prompted countless appraisals of his legacy and place in golf’s history. By the most common metric, wins in major tournaments, his seven titles put him in a five-way tie for seventh place, trailing Jack Nicklaus (left), Tiger Woods, Walter Hagen, Ben Hogan, Gary ...

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“Crisis in Six Scenes” is underwhelming from the first

[ad_1] THERE is a telling moment at the start of “Crisis in Six Scenes”, Woody Allen’s new television series. It is the late 1960s and writer Sid Munsinger, played by Mr Allen with familiar idiosyncratic verbosity, is in a barber’s chair in suburban New York. The barber confesses it took him the entire winter to finish Sid’s novel—he simply could ...

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“The Girl on the Train”: not quite on the right track

[ad_1] This review contains plot details of “The Girl on the Train” THE first thing that will strike British audiences watching “The Girl on the Train” is how huge the houses are. Rachel, the alcoholic protagonist of Paula Hawkins’s bestselling novel of the same name, has been uprooted from London to upstate New York. Here, instead of whizzing past rows ...

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Man in the dock

[ad_1] The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan. By Sebastian Mallaby. Penguin Press; 781 pages; $40. Bloomsbury; £25. THE former chairman of the Federal Reserve was once a hero. Now he is being called a villain. Yet it is too soon to be sure what history will say about him. In a superb new book, the ...

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Global Citizen Festival: a mash-up of music fans, bands and prime ministers

[ad_1] BEFORE digital connectivity, non-profit organisations benefited from concerts that solicited donations and touted their causes. The 1971 Concert for Bangladesh raised money for UNICEF; 1985’s Live Aid sent famine relief to Ethiopia, and since 2004, the Black Ball has collected millions to fight AIDS. Now the charity concert model is changing. Millennials prefer festivals to black-tie affairs, and use ...

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Killing fields

[ad_1] A Fiery & Furious People: A History of Violence in England. By James Sharpe. Random House; 751 pages; £30. IF ONE wants proof that the past is, indeed, a different country, it is instructive to look at the rate of baby-killing. In late-Victorian England, a fifth of all known murder victims were under a year old. Infanticide had been ...

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Visit Osaka, and turn into a fish, in VR

[ad_1] EARLIER this year The Economist launched its first virtual-reality experience, “RecoVR Mosul: A collective reconstruction”. It is a digital recreation of the Mosul Museum, and some of the artefacts inside it, which were destroyed by Islamic State militants in 2015. “RecoVR Mosul” went on to win the jury prize for innovation at the 2016 British Interactive Media Awards and a ...

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Horrible history

[ad_1] The Poisoned Well: Empire and its Legacy in the Middle East. By Roger Hardy. Oxford University Press; 272 pages; $27.95. Hurst; 243 pages; £20 THIS engaging book had its genesis in a ten-part radio series created by the author for the BBC World Service at the start of the 1990s. It is fair to say that the intervening years ...

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“Snowden” fails to give movie-goers the whole truth

[ad_1] IT IS easy to forget, watching Joseph Gordon-Levitt in “Snowden”, that it is the slight actor from “Third Rock from the Sun” and “Inception” on screen and not the former NSA contractor himself. So spookily does Mr Gordon-Levitt inhabit Edward Snowden’s v-neck t-shirts, imitate his voice, infiltrate his mannerisms, that he crosses the line from acting to impersonation. In ...

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Civilised and civilising

[ad_1] Kenneth Clark: Life, Art and “Civilisation”. By James Stourton. William Collins; 478 pages; £30. To be published in America by Knopf in November. LORD CLARK OF SALTWOOD, who was ennobled by Harold Wilson in 1969 after the triumph of his epic television series “Civilisation”, became known more familiarly as Lord Clark of Civilisation. To one unsympathetic academic critic in ...

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